Review : Parker 62cc Chainsaw

Review : Parker 62cc Chainsaw

One of the more expensive tools that I need to buy is the chainsaw. With the amount of wood we process we could not do the work by hand. My trusty Husqvarna has got a problem with its chain brake and I dreaded entering the autumn and winter with only a faulty saw. One good storm can mean you need a fully functioning chainsaw immediately at the most inconvenient time. Our last tree came down on a Sunday evening; not a good time to find you need to purchase a new saw.

My Husqvarna will be fixed soon but I needed a spare saw to cover this kind of eventuality and decided I would chance buying a cheap Chinese saw for emergencies.After much research (asking my friends and looking on the internet) I decided to opt for the Parker 62cc petrol chainsaw. The reviews were good and, although manufactured in China, it was offered by a British company which could be convenient for any future spares and services.

Lots of added extras for the price

The most surprising thing about the chainsaw was the price. Under £90 got me a chainsaw with a 20 inch blade, two chains, a toolkit (spanners, screwdriver and chainsaw file) and a carrying case. The speed of delivery was also good as it arrived here in rural Wales within 72 hours of ordering. It was easy to assemble just requiring the bar and chain to be attached, then to be filled with oil and petrol (mix of 25:1 using the supplied mixing flask) and I was ready to go.

Pleasant appearance and well balanced

Looking at the construction it is fairly well put together and fits the hand nicely. It is rather heavy as you would expect with a 20 inch bar but the 62cc petrol engine works this easily as it develops 3.5 horsepower. I may put a shorter bar on in the future. I need the 20 inch bar at the moment for felling, as I have some large trees, but for general day-to-day wood management a shorter bar (16 or 18 inch) is a lot more convenient. It is also safer as it is less tiring to wield and a lot less prone to the problems of kick-back. The longer blade does require much more careful handling as it is more difficult to keep an eye on the nose of the blade so that it doesn’t foul on anything and jerk back towards you.

I am glad to report that the machine starts very easily. This is one of my most important factors in choosing an appliance. I hate standing in the cold and wet, sweating, swearing and ranting at an engine that won’t start and that I have probably flooded. Two or three pulls on a cold start, or one pull on a warm start, and it fires into action. The vibrations are well damped and the machine is comfortable to handle. The Parker brand blade cuts fine and time will tell if it lasts. I have used the machine for a week now and been very pleased with its performance. For the price I am very surprised at how well it works, fingers crossed that it has reasonable durability.

I have attached a video of the saw working on a piece of beech. My apologies that I have no models to employ so the viewer is left with the author demonstrating. This clearly shows that old men are sometimes close to the limits of their strength when faced with relatively small logs but, on the other hand, the chainsaw trousers are, I believe, very fetching 🤨

Old man with logs

Finally, found my epitaph.

Mea Culpa! I should have posted this much earlier and I apologize for the delay. Two years ago I was felling some trees which were a mixture of larch, eucalyptus, oak and beech. During this time I learnt a life-lesson that I vowed I would pass on to anyone who would listen. I had hoped that once I have passed away that, in the future, someone would say “At least I was warned. I knew what to do” and I would be able to rest in peace knowing I had made an impact on the world.

Gym equipment

Today’s workout was aimed at the arms and back. It had simple gym equipment; a bow saw and a maul (It is not called an axe, it is a maul, or at least a sledge axe). My intention was to start taking this years felled wood and splitting it for storage. Three hours of this is a good workout in anyone’s book. This year we had mainly cedar, oak, ash (because we have some Ash Die Back disease) and beech. It was then I remembered – I had not warned people about the beech tree, I had failed in my duty to the world!

There is a lot to be said for beech as a firewood. It is a dense wood which has a lot of thermal energy stored within it and an excellent firewood when properly seasoned. The chart below shows some of the properties of woods when they are considered as sources of fuel :-

Name Million British Thermal Units/cordCoaling
potential(*)
Oak29.1Excellent
Beech27.5Excellent
Elm20Excellent
Ash24.2Good
Sycamore19.5Good
Cedar18.2Poor

Therefore, I was quite happy to have a large quantity of beech for next years stove and oven. All I have to do is to season it. Beech takes about 12 months to dry properly when it is split and stacked. Thankfully I remembered something that I had intended to tell the world and had forgotton – It is vital to split beech when it is green. Some woods split better when wet and others when they are dry. The firs split very easily when dry for example but most hardwoods split more easily when still wet.

Beech doesn’t like splitting even when it is green. It takes a lot of force, a lot of swearing and a lot of time to split beech. It will sorely tax your patience and really test your mettle. There will be times when you look at one of the rounds which has resisted your onslaught and you will think “stuff this for a game of soldiers, let’s move onto the cedar for a while“. But don’t be tempted , because if beech is difficult to split when green it becomes impossible once it has seasoned. Seasoned beech and eucalyptus are well-nigh indestructible. You will bring your maul down with all your might only to find it makes a minor dent, a loud bang and slips away jerking your hands leaving the log intact. These lumps of seasoned wood will take on the strength of rock and will drive you insane as you try to split them manually. It is best to bypass this stage and just buy, or rent, a hydraulic log-splitter.

This is the message I must leave for the world – Always split beech (and eucalyptus) shortly after felling; never, ever leave it until they it has dried. Remember this message, you will thank me one day.


(*) Coaling is the ability of a wood to form good slow burning coals which will last and is an excellent property  for use in wood-stoves