Am I Just My Brain by Sharon Dirckx

I was listening to an online debate which considered the topic of panpsychism (The idea that everything is conscious to some degree) when I heard about this book. As it seemed to consider that perennial, but vital, problem for philosophy of the “mind-brain” problem I decided to give it a try.

It is quite clearly a book of two parts. The first part considers the problem that are encountered when we try to take a simple materialistic viewpoint of the mind and the limitations that still exist when we adopt any of the dualist positions. These arguments are well described and the strengths and weakness of each position well delineated. In particular the problems we encounter with the issues of free will and personhood, when we adopt a unitary materialistic (You are your brain) position, are well made. This is a useful counterpoint to much of the current media which feels that this issue has been solved.

I can remember working through this period when the advances in the neurosciences seemed to leave little room for the mind. There seemed to be little need to consider the psyche as we could now explain everything by looking at the brain. Certainly this approach played great dividends in my specialised area (dementia) but it never seem to offer any hope of help to those poor souls troubled by purely turmoil in the mind. Indeed the only real change was that psychiatry seemed to change from being ‘brainless’ to become simply ‘mindless’.

The first part of the book is successful but the second half is, unfortunately, less so. The latter portion of the book takes the stance that, if there is evidence that consciousness is best looked in a non-material way (qualitatively rather than quantitatively), then we can take this as proof for the Christian beliefs. I found this much harder to take for two reasons. Firstly the arguments were less well laid out and argued and secondly I felt she presumed faith on the reader’s part. I think someone who is already a believer would find the statements convincing. However, a reader who does not already have religious faith (especially if this is not Christian) will find this half of the book heavy with statements lacking convincing support.

Overall, an interesting read, brief but engaging, initially at least.

4 thoughts on “Am I Just My Brain by Sharon Dirckx

  1. Thoughtful review. I am always leery of any writing which claims to prove Christianity. Although I am a Christian, faith and grace are quite impossible to prove. Hence the idea of “faith,” after all.

    1. Yes, a nice easy proof and “poof” no need for faith anymore. However, this is also the hardest thing to write about; trying to convey the quality of faith to someone else is difficult task

      1. I always think of Eliot “Words strain,
        Crack and sometimes break, under the burden,
        Under the tension, slip, slide, perish,
        Decay with imprecision, will not stay in place,
        Will not stay still.” I always think of this when trying to speak of faith.

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